The Components of Collective Intelligence and their Predictors: Collective Reasoning, Attention and Memory
NetSI Speaker Series
Erik Kommol
Research and Teaching Assistant, Vienna University of Economics and Business
Past Talk
Hybrid talk
Wednesday
Aug 24, 2022
Watch video
11:00 am
177 Huntington Ave
Virtual
11th floor
Online
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This will be a hybrid in-person and remote talk.

Prior literature indicates that the performance of human groups across a variety of tasks can be explained by one common statistical factor termed “collective intelligence” (CI). However, there is an ongoing discussion about the validity of the one-factor-model and prior studies indicate that CI might be better explained by a more complex latent structure. We propose a hierarchical model of collective intelligence introducing collective reasoning, memory and attention as sub-factors of an overarching CI-factor. We test our model on a sample of 22 studies, including 5,279 individuals in 1,356 groups using meta-analysis. The hierarchical model shows a superior fit in comparison to the one-factor model in the complete sample as well as in a variety of subsamples. Furthermore, our results indicate that CI functions differently for established groups vs. newly formed groups as the hierarchical model displays a better fit for established groups. Our subsequent subgroup analysis suggests a higher specialization of CI in established groups as they show higher performances across tasks, higher heterogeneity in performance and lower intercorrelations between tasks compared to newly formed groups. Furthermore, we show that sub-factors of CI are predicted by individual skill and social perceptiveness and discuss implications of these findings. Our results contribute to a nuanced understanding of CI and its predictors across a variety of groups and settings.

About the speaker
About the speaker
Erik Kommol was born in Berlin, Germany. After his high school degree he moved to Vienna and completed his Bachelor’s and Master's degree at the University of Vienna in Psychology. During that time, Erik worked as a Research Assistant at the Institute for Methods of Psychology, which specialized in meta-research and reproducibility. Additionally, he worked as a psychometrician in the private sector, where he constructed personality questionnaires and cognitive ability tests for the use in HR, traffic psychology and neuropsychology.
Erik Kommol was born in Berlin, Germany. After his high school degree he moved to Vienna and completed his Bachelor’s and Master's degree at the University of Vienna in Psychology. During that time, Erik worked as a Research Assistant at the Institute for Methods of Psychology, which specialized in meta-research and reproducibility. Additionally, he worked as a psychometrician in the private sector, where he constructed personality questionnaires and cognitive ability tests for the use in HR, traffic psychology and neuropsychology.