Dissecting the kinetics and transmission heterogeneity of SARS-CoV-2
Visiting speaker
Kaiyuan Sun
Research Scientist, Division of International Epidemiology and Population Studies, Fogarty International Center, US National Institutes of Health
Past Talk
Hybrid talk
Thursday
Nov 17, 2022
Watch video
11:00 am
177 Huntington Ave
Virtual
11th floor
Online
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Understanding the kinetics and drivers of SARS-CoV-2 transmission are key for its control and mitigation. In this talk, I will present the behavioral, genomic, and immunological factors that shapes the kinetics and transmission heterogeneity of SARS-CoV-2 by synthesizing findings from several epidemiological studies carried out during the COVID19 pandemic. I will also discuss the public health implications of these findings.

About the speaker
About the speaker
Dr. Kaiyuan Sun is a research scientist at the Division of International Epidemiology and Population Studies, Fogarty International Center, US National Institutes of Health. He obtained his PhD in Physics at Northeastern University in 2018. His research focuses on modeling host- pathogen dynamics of infectious diseases that affect human population. He has worked on pathogens that cause global public health emergencies, including Ebola, Zika and SARS-CoV-2 and is particularly interested in using mathematical models to translate findings of epidemiological studies to population-level impact and inform public health decision making. His research findings have been presented to public health agencies in the United States, China, South Africa, Costa Rica, and to the World Health Organization.
Dr. Kaiyuan Sun is a research scientist at the Division of International Epidemiology and Population Studies, Fogarty International Center, US National Institutes of Health. He obtained his PhD in Physics at Northeastern University in 2018. His research focuses on modeling host- pathogen dynamics of infectious diseases that affect human population. He has worked on pathogens that cause global public health emergencies, including Ebola, Zika and SARS-CoV-2 and is particularly interested in using mathematical models to translate findings of epidemiological studies to population-level impact and inform public health decision making. His research findings have been presented to public health agencies in the United States, China, South Africa, Costa Rica, and to the World Health Organization.